The nuclear subcontinent
Read Online
Share

The nuclear subcontinent calling for a con-federative remaking of United Nations upon a millennium charter of human unity by Asiananda.

  • 351 Want to read
  • ·
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Minerva Press [in association with Sri Aurobindo Centre for Human Unity] in New Delhi .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • India.,
  • Pakistan.

Subjects:

  • Nuclear nonproliferation.,
  • Nuclear weapons -- India.,
  • Nuclear weapons -- Pakistan.

Book details:

About the Edition

In the context of Indian subcontinent.

Edition Notes

StatementAsiananda, Hakemulder.
ContributionsHakemulder, Jan R.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKZ5675 .A84 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationxix, 459 p. ;
Number of Pages459
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4004048M
ISBN 108176621811
LC Control Number2001357943
OCLC/WorldCa48507779

Download The nuclear subcontinent

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

India's recent nuclear tests and Pakistan's response yesterday form the most important international development since the end of the Cold nedBy Zalmay KhalilzadAuthor: Zalmay Khalilzad. Prospects for stability in a nuclear subcontinent. Bangalore: National Institute of Advanced Studies, © (OCoLC) Online version: Prospects for stability in a nuclear subcontinent. Bangalore: National Institute of Advanced Studies, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors. "The most likely site for a nuclear war is the Indian subcontinent, but we have little understanding of India's nuclear program. This will change with George Perkovich's fascinating and important study. It is informed, free from bias, and a great read as well."—Robert Jervis, Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics, Columbia University"George Perkovich has written a /5(2). There is concern about the proliferation of nuclear arms in the sub-continent. This book examines what influences arms policies there and argues that, although both India and Pakistan are determined to retain their nuclear option, both would welcome a situation which allowed them to de-militarize.

This chapter argues the need to distinguish between the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the issues of both non-proliferation and nuclear. Skip to main content. T&F logo. Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Global Security book. Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Global Security. A View from the Indian Subcontinent.   Editor's Note: In the aftermath of the Indian and Pakistani nuclear tests, Foreign Affairs has published "Against Nuclear Apartheid" by India's senior adviser on defense and foreign affairs, Jaswant Singh, (September/October ) and "Dealing with the Bomb in South Asia" by Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott (March/April ). Neighbours in Arms: An American Senator’s Quest for Disarmament in a Nuclear Subcontinent CLCWebmaster T+ Careers in the U.S. Navy (Careers in the US Armed Forces) CLCWebmaster T+ India's late "nuclear visionary" and army chief, Gen. K. Sunderji, had preached for years from a thick tome that came to be known as the "Sunderji Bible." His principal claim was that nuclear weapons would bring stability to the subcontinent, and that there would be no Cold War-type nuclear racing.

Review: Neighbours in Arms: An American Senator’s Quest for Disarmament in a Nuclear Subcontinent by Larry Pressler Though the Pressler Amendment was designed to help Pakistan wriggle out of. Using a constructivist model, this study brings nuclear arms control and disarmament back into the debates on the future of Indo-Pakistani relations. Constructivism recognizes the independent impact of international norms, such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Norm (NNPN), on India and Pakistan’s nuclear behavior. Even though the NNPN does not legally bind them, it is reinforced at the. His recent book, Neighbours in Arms: An American Senator’s Quest for Disarmament in a Nuclear Subcontinent, opens wounds of that past era. The book is a tale of the conflicted Pakistan-U.S. relationship spanning many years. Lacking the citations of scholarly writing, the book reads, rather, as a memoir of the author’s personal experiences and.   Make no mistake when I write about the directness of the book. It isn't a biased account of Pakistan being the bad country and India being the good one. However the writer has dissected the facts from his time as a senator and given a logical explanation of what went wrong in the Sub-continent as far as nuclear proliferation is s: